Victoria Falls

Victoria Falls
Victoria Falls in Southern Africa is o­ne of the world's most popular attractions. In 1989 it became a World Heritage Site and was designated as o­ne of the planet's most spectacular waterfalls. It is also the world's largest falling water, is consisted of seven waterfalls, and is o­ne of the natural wonders.

Called "Smoke That Thunders" by the Kololo tribe, Victoria Falls plunges 100 metres into a gorge below the brink of the 1700m wide lip of the Zambezi River, thereby creating every minute between 20,000 and 500,000 cubic metres of water. The roar can be heard and the mist can be seen more than 20 kilometres away from the Falls.

The downstream rapids create the most breathtaking white water rafting and riverboarding. The highest bungee jump in the world is located here, plunging 111 metres down from the Victoria Falls bridge. Also included in the park are six national monuments and a town. The rain forest across from the Falls is sustained by the spray from the water. You can also go fishing or bird watching in the area.

Victoria Falls
The 19th century explorers, hunters, and surveyors were intrigued by Victoria Falls after it was discovered in November, 1855 by David Livingstone, who named the Falls for his British Queen Victoria. There is a Flight of the Angels over the Falls, and that name came about because Livingstone wrote of the "scenes so lovely, they must have been gazed upon by angels in their flight".

The Falls continue giving the same fascination today to the many visiting tourists and honeymooners who perhaps have also come o­n a safari to game farms nearby.